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Introduction to the IPCRG's Research Strategy

The IPCRG has been consulting experts in primary care, respiratory research, our members and associate members to develop a comprehensive research strategy that we believe is required in primary care respiratory medicine. To be selected, issues have to be of global importance and not just nationally relevant. This provides a framework for the development of our own research programme and should provide guidance to potential researchers and research funders planning to study priority research areas in primary care respiratory medicine.

Our priorities are to conduct research of real practical value to primary care practitioners, policy makers and patients in both developed and developing countries. We expect our research to be conducted by researchers and practitioners with significant experience of primary care and other community settings. We anticipate that our wide international network, and the enthusiasm of our members for such an initiative, will enable studies to be undertaken rapidly, cost effectively and with a high level of applicability.

The scope includes prevention, diagnosis and management across the common respiratory conditions managed in primary care: asthma, allergic rhinitis, COPD, and infectious disease; and the most important cross-cutting intervention: smoking cessation. We have a particular interest in exploring and researching practical approaches to patient-centred care.  Click here to see our prioritised research needs statements. 

Inevitably, our views may change over time as new evidence is published. Therefore we have chosen to publish this statement on our website so that it can be updated and respond to new information. If you wish to contribute to the agenda please complete the proforma here.

If you wish to discuss a research proposal please contact us via the online proforma here.

To view current information relating to the research of the IPCRG, you can download a copy of a presentation given at our most recent Scientific Meeting in Uppsala in May 2013. To download the powerpoint presentation, please click here.

Blogposts Research

  The UNLOCK validation study Primary Care COPD Patients Compared with Large Pharmaceutically-Sponsored COPD Studies has been published in PLOS ONE. The studyevaluated the external validity of six LPCS (ISOLDE, TRISTAN, TORCH, UPLIFT, ECLIPSE, POET-COPD) on which current guidelines are based. It found that primary care COPD patients stand out from patients enrolled in LPCS in terms of gender, lung function, quality of life and exacerbations.…
Labels: research, unlock
See here for first use of the Desktop Helper in a research project that concluded among Swiss GPs and patients, both our innovative communication tool and the IPCRG tool were well accepted and both merit further dissemination and application in research. Acceptance and practicability of a visual communication tool in smoking cessation counselling: a randomised controlled trialStefan Neuner-Jehle, Marianne I Knecht, Claudia Stey-Steurer,Oliver Senn. To view click here: http://www.thepcrj.…
Authors: Cave AJ, Atkinson L, Tsiligianni IG, Kaplan AG Published Date July 2012 Volume 2012:7 Pages 447 - 456 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/COPD.S29868 COPD is considered a complex disease and global problem that is predicted to be the third most common cause of death by 2030. While managing this chronic condition, primary health care practitioners are faced with the ongoing challenge of achieving good quality of life and overall "wellness" for those affected. As such,…
Impact of chronic respiratory symptoms in a rural area of sub-Saharan Africa: an in-depth qualitative study in the Masindi district of Uganda by our Our FRESH-AIR Uganda team is now online: F van Gemert et al. Prim Care Respir J 2013;22(X): XX-XX http://dx.doi.org/10.4104/pcrj.2013.00064  Abstract Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), once regarded as a disease of developed countries, is now recognised as a common disease in low- and middle-income countries.…
  OBJECTIVE: To assess the long term effects of two different modes of disease management (comprehensive self management and routine monitoring) on quality of life (primary objective), frequency and patients' management of exacerbations, and self efficacy (secondary objectives) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in general practice. DESIGN: 24 month, multicentre, investigator blinded, three arm, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial.…
Juliet McDonnell, Siân Williams, Niels H Chavannes, Jaime Correia de Sousa, H John Fardy, Monica Fletcher, James Stout, Ron Tomlins, Osman M Yusuf, Hilary Pinnock Abstract:This discussion paper describes a scoping exercise and literature review commissioned by the International Primary Care Respiratory Group (IPCRG) to inform their E-Quality programme which seeks to support small-scale educational projects to improve respiratory management in primary care.…
doi:10.1186/1471-2296-14-21 Background: Pulmonary Rehabilitation for moderate Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in primary care could improve patients’ quality of life.   Methods: This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a 3-month Pulmonary Rehabilitation (PR) program with afurther 9 months of maintenance (RHBM group) compared with both PR for 3 months without further maintenance(RHB group) and usual care in improving the quality of life of patients with moderate COPD.…
Using meta-analysis, the authors combined data from 13 randomized controlled trials in order to determine the impact of nutritional interventions on various improvements of anthropometric measures in COPD patients. The meta-analysis revealed that contrary to the results of published studies, nutritional support improved nutrition parameters for body weight and was associated with improved grip strength. An improved caloric and protein intake was also seen.…
A paper created with the help of the IPCRG and the PCRS-UK via the UKRRF in the Primary Respiratory Care Journal 'Clinical implications of the Royal College of Physicians three questions in routine asthma care: a real-life validation study' the pdf can be downloaded here. Abstract Background: Annual recording of the Royal College of Physicians three questions (RCP3Q) morbidity score is rewarded within the UK ‘pay-for-performance’ Quality and Outcomes Framework.…
Labels: side-focus
Identifying the most current and practical research questions allows prioritization of research. The IPCRG (International Primary Care Respiratory Group) polled 23 experts from 21 countries and had them rate as important and feasible, on a scale from 1-5, 145 research questions involving asthma, rhinitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, smoking and respiratory infections. Of these, there was strong agreement as to the importance and feasibility of 67 questions.…
Abstract The Brussels Declaration, published in the European Respiratory Journal in 2008 1, recognises the high prevalence of patients with poorly controlled asthma and calls for changes in asthma management across Europe. Prescribing an appropriate inhaler device for asthma, a device that the patient accepts and can handle correctly, is one key element in this process. Inhaler mishandling is very common in real-world clinical practice and can contribute to poor asthma control 2–5.…
Abstract AIM: To determine the feasibility of recruiting patients with early chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) to the Health Enhancing Activity in Lung THerapy (HEALTH) exercise and education programme. METHODS: Patients with early COPD were identified from general practices. Those meeting the study inclusion criteria were administered tiotropium throughout the study period. Participants were randomised to either an eight-week health enhancing and physical activity (HEPA) programme,…
Abstract Globally, asthma morbidity remains unacceptably high. If outcomes are to be improved, it is crucial that routine review consultations in primary care are performed to a high standard. Key components of a review include: • Assessment of control using specific morbidity questions to elucidate the presence of symptoms, in conjunction with the frequency of use of short-acting bronchodilators and any recent history of acute attacks • After consideration of the diagnosis,…
Abstract Although the majority of patients with chronic upper airway diseases have controlled symptoms during treatment, many patients have severe chronic upper airway diseases (SCUADs). SCUAD defines those patients whose symptoms are inadequately controlled despite adequate (ie, effective, safe, and acceptable) pharmacologic treatment based on guidelines. These patients have impaired quality of life, social functioning, sleep, and school/work performance. Severe uncontrolled allergic rhinitis,…
Abstract Clinical Practice Guidelines for allergic rhinitis have been developed over the past 15 years and have been found to improve the care for patients with allergic rhinitis. The ARIA (allergic rhinitis and its impact on asthma) guideline was the first of these evidenced-based guidelines, developed with primary care physicians. Subsequent guidelines include those by the IPCRG, BSACI, the AAAAI/ACAAI Practice Parameters for the diagnosis and management of rhinitis, and the ARIA 2008 Update.…
Abstract National and international asthma guidelines stress that before making changes to patients’ therapy their compliance and inhaler technique should be checked. This review addresses these issues and highlights the differences between inhalers in terms of inhaler technique, individual ability/competence, and ease of use. The advantages and disadvantages of metered-dose inhalers (MDIs) and dry powder inhalers (DPIs) are presented.…
AbstractChronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, yet it remains significantly under-diagnosed. Systematic and opportunistic case-identification efforts in primary care, using questionnaires, careful assessment to identify symptoms, and follow-up spirometry, might improve diagnosis rates and enable earlier detection and management of COPD.…
Abstract Background Lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) is common in the community, and may result in hospitalization or death. This observational study aimed to investigate the role of antibiotics in the management of LRTI in UK primary care. Methods Patients receiving a first diagnosis of LRTI during 2004 and satisfying inclusion and data quality criteria were identified in the General Practice Research Database.…
Abstract Asthma is a highly prevalent condition across Europe and numerous guidelines have been developed to optimise management. However, asthma can be neither cured nor prevented, treatment choices are limited and many patients have poorly controlled or uncontrolled asthma. The Brussels Declaration on Asthma, sponsored by The Asthma, Allergy and Inflammation Research Charity,…
Abstract: Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a very common disease with over 600 million people (200 million of them with concomitant asthma) worldwide suffering from it. The majority of patients who seek medical advice are seen in primary care. Although there is a selection of guidelines focused on the management of AR, there is a paucity of guidance on how best to identify patients who would most benefit from treatment.…

 

 

 

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